Home » UK’s Ken Troske named to American Economic Association post

UK’s Ken Troske named to American Economic Association post

The University of Kentucky’s Ken Troske certainly is no stranger to taking on assignments of national significance.
Ken Troske
Ken Troske

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 20, 2017) — The University of Kentucky’s Ken Troske certainly is no stranger to taking on assignments of national significance. The latest example is his recent appointment to serve on the American Economics Association’s (AEA) Committee on Government Relations.

The committee represents the interests of the economics profession to policymakers in Washington, D.C., and around the country. The AEA is the largest professional organization of economists.

Troske is associate dean for graduate programs and outreach and the Richard W. and Janis H. Furst Endowed Chair of Economics in the Gatton College of Business and Economics and earlier this month helped present the report of the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking (CEP) to members of Congress and the White House. The CEP was established to develop a strategy for increasing the availability and use of data in order to build evidence about government programs, while protecting privacy and confidentiality.

Previously, Troske served as one of only five members of the Congressional Oversight Panel in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. That group’s task was to assess the existing condition of America’s financial markets and the regulatory system as well as to closely monitor the actions of the Treasury Department and financial institutions to determine if their actions are in the best interest of the American economy.

“I look forward to participating with my colleagues on the AEA Committee on Government Relations,” Troske said. “The committee serves as a strong, independent voice for economists around the country without taking positions on questions of economic policy or any partisan matter.

More information about the AEA can be found at www.aeaweb.org/about-aea.


• Troske discusses current trends in American economics and the impact of government collapses